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How to Make an Easy Infinity Scarf

Long scarves look great, until it gets a bit windy.  Then, the ends start to wrap themselves round your neck like a cobra, or untangle Rupert the Bear style until you give up with them all together.

I finally get to put my ridiculously large collection of scarves to use.  Ideally, I'd like to go out and buy a whole collection of new ones, but to get more wear out of the ones I have, I've been transforming them into the style I love and wear most often: the infinity scarf.  It's really easy and you don't have to own a sewing machine to create the same effect - just a scarf/large cut of fabric and fabric glue.  Infinity scarves give you a 100% better chance of looking like you did when you first left the house.
I chose a large fabric cut of 197cm x 115cm in a pretty Spring-is-on-the-way pattern.   The steps I followed were based on using a super-extra-long length scarf, already hemmed [from Primark].
To create my infinity scarf, I started by folding the material lengthways and joining the fabric at the hemmed sides and entire length with fabric glue [creating a size of fabric 98.5cm x 57.5cm]:

You can be fairly generous with the glue and don't worry if it's not the neatest - it all dries clear:

...I left to dry completely.
Bringing the two ends [unglued] round to meet each other.........
....I glued the inside seam of one side:
....and lay the opposite end along the glue:
...continuing across the length and then leaving to dry completely
[you can repeat this step as many times as you want, continuing to fold and glue along the seam to gather the fabric - this would be especially useful if your fabric will not be long enough to loop round and will instead be more like a snood].  I hope that this has made sense - please let me know if not!
The fabric is now a lovely large loop:
.....that you can gather, fold and twist in half to create loops:
Bring on the wind!
see you next time x
Notes:
  • You can continue folding your fabric lengthways and gluing in place at the hems as many times as you like to create more folds of fabric.
  • Use the main seam created where the two ends have joined together as your guide for the back of the scarf and centre of any twists or loops to keep it hidden.
  • This can be applied to any type of fabric - if you don't have hems already sewn in place, neaten any edges by folding and ironing the edges to the inside of the material and then gluing the insides together to hide them.  This starts as a good base to then continue to fold lengthways and join the ends together. 

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